Football Is Back!

Football Is Back!

by Brock Benson

“Gentlemen, this is a football”

Those famous words spoken by the legendary Green Bay Packers coach Vince Lombardi still stir the emotions of millions of football enthusiasts worldwide.  Spoken in the 1961 training camp, Lombardi was reorienting his team to what mattered most – the fundamentals.

As a mild football enthusiast I don’t follow a lot of football action but two stories this off-season have caught my attention in particular.  Since some of those reading won’t be familiar with these stories I will try to give a brief overview of the little bit that I know.

 

Story 1

In July one of the more successful SEC coaches, Hugh Freeze, resigned from his position as head coach at Ole Miss. Apparently some of the drama was surrounding escort communication Freeze had engaged in on behalf of players who he was recruiting.  To put it succinctly the situation at Ole Miss is disheartening, irritating, and downright EXPECTED. (I’ll get to that in a moment.)

 

Story 2

America’s team the Dallas Cowboys are in the spotlight due to the suspension of legendary Ohio State running back Ezekiel Elliot. The NFL elected to suspend Elliot for 6 games for violating the league’s personal conduct policy surrounding domestic violence accusations made by Elliot’s ex-girlfriend. The latest news is that Elliot plans to appeal the suspension. What will be the ultimate outcome? Only time will tell…

One of the facts I have found most interesting is the heat Jerry Jones (famous owner of the Dallas Cowboys) is getting from the media for how he has supported Elliot during this time. Radio hosts on our own local 104.5 have aired how negatively they feel Jones has handled this whole situation.

A few years ago when all the drama from Penn State hit the media I was devastated. I’m not an official Nittany Lion fan but my granddad was an Alumni and so growing up I remember how much I loved watching them play especially when I was with him. So to hear what happened crushed me.

Football brings out a lot of passion and pride for people, especially college football. As fans our smack talk reaches its height when college rivalry weekend comes. Why? We want to beat our rival. Actually that was too soft. We want to CRUSH them. Fair?

It’s this very sentiment that should cause us to pause especially in the midst of these recent stories and do something every good football player does after a game. Film Study. It’s in the film room we look back and reflect on how we played and what we could do better. I don’t claim to know the ins and outs of football since I’ve never played. But one thing I’ve heard is truly great players like Peyton Manning or more locally our own Blaine Bishop (former Titans safety) is they took the film room very seriously and really worked hard in reflecting on the game.

Why did Hugh Freeze, Ezekiel Elliot, Jerry Jones, and even Joe Paterno act the way they acted? Perhaps you won’t agree but I think it’s because we wanted them to.

Winning is everything. Even in the midst of trying to provide hope and healing for the Ole Miss faithful hear what former coach Tommy Tuberville said:

“It’s just a sad day for them, it really is, because people in that state really want to win games and want to be competitive at Ole Miss. They’ve done a great job to this point, and now they’ve had a terrible setback.”  (http://www.espn.com/college-football/story/_/id/20342694)

Sure we would never say we condone the actions of these individuals but the pressure we put on them as fans to win is serious. And so is it any wonder they act the ways in which they do? NO! Furthermore we should expect it to happen again and again and keep expecting it to happen until something happens and hearts get wrecked over the bigger problem.

Maybe you think I am being harsh or unreal. But doesn’t the Bible tells us the first murder ever committed was because of a brother who was competitive? Cain wanted to win and beat out his little brother and felt spited when God accepted his brothers offering over his. (See Genesis 4)

As football fans we can continue to expect this behavior from coaches, owners and players because we want to WIN. And we might not say it verbally but our hearts are so attached to the WIN at times we don’t care as much about how it was attained so long as it’s attained. I’m grateful to the various universities and organizations like the NFL who try at times to make a stand for what’s right but I wonder are we seeing the real struggle? Are we upset over sin or because Elliot being out might cost us a few games in our fantasy league?

I know your attention span is running thin but this is real for so many of us, myself included. I’m stupid competitive in everything I do. I have been ever since I was a little boy and use to race my little brother to see which one of us could get done with our paper route faster. It doesn’t matter whether it is fishing, sports, coaching, or life itself. I want to WIN. I almost wear it like a badge of honor most days. But when I don’t win, I face legitimate depression-like tendencies. Why? Because I easily forget my FUNDAMENTALS. I forget that it’s not primarily in those arenas God has wired me to be competitive in. Instead I must be reminded of the most basic of fundamentals, like who my real competition and enemy is. The Bible tells me he is like a lion and he seeks to steal, kill and destroy me and everyone one else in his path.

I love football and I am not going to quit watching it this fall. And I hope you won’t either. But instead of getting mad and caught up in the drama mix like I so easily do I am going to try and realize how my sin nature has to be fought. My college football coach, Will Muschamp, gets really angry when the gamecocks get railroaded…which happens a lot unfortunately. Why? Because he has fanatic fans like me who want him to win and who get angry when he doesn’t. I’m not proud of the fact there have been many Saturdays watching the gamecocks where I got even angrier than Muschamp/Spurrier themselves but its true. I wanted them to win and they know I wanted them to win. And so when they didn’t…well it was bad, really bad.

Football is back! May this be a call for us to rise up and allow the competitive drive God’s given us to be fuel against our real enemy! May we take him on together remembering the fundamentals this fall. And through doing so, see how God’s shaping our hearts even as we enjoy the big hits and the long passes!

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Book Report: “Movies Are Prayers”

by Phil Baker

Author Josh Larsen started his career as a journalist reviewing movies for various mainstream publications before landing at the website ThinkChristian.com. A guest shot on the movie discussion podcast Filmspotting eventually led to him becoming the full-time co-host. His well-thought and well-articulated insight gave credibility to his conservative Christian perspective despite it being a secular podcast.

“Movies Are Prayers” is his first book, but one that feels like it’s been simmering inside him for a while. Larsen explains that any time humanity creates, cries out to, or just wonders at the universe, he is praying, citing the popular adage “Prayer is exhaling the spirit of man and inhaling the spirit of God.” He broadens that statement to include nonbelievers saying “even the howl of an atheist is directed at the God they don’t acknowledge.”

Larsen proceeds to walk through nine different types of prayer:

  • Praise
  • Yearning
  • Lament
  • Anger
  • Confession
  • Reconciliation
  • Obedience
  • Meditation and Contemplation
  • and Joy

He gives a few movies for each that express those types of prayers. For example; he focuses on several Wes Anderson films that express Prayers of Yearning, dissecting the various melancholy denizens of Anderson’s stories. For Prayers of Mediation and Contemplation, Larsen highlights silent movie star Buster Keaton and his often expressionless face throughout his various silver screen adventures. And Prayers of Joy are portrayed through the classic musicals of Fred Astaire and the “holy nonsense” of the Muppets.

Each chapter is like a well-supported essay. But it isn’t until the final chapter that Larsen reveals that each of the prayer types retraces the journey of man and his relationship with God – from the Praise of His new creation, to man’s Anger at God, to the beauty of Reconciliation, and finally back to the Joy of a right relationship with Him. He expounds upon that using a single movie – another of Wes Anderson’s – Rushmore. Unlike the other movies cited, you really should watch Rushmore before reading this book, or at least before reading the last chapter, because Larson lets the spoilers fly as he delights in explaining how each prayer is played out through several characters’ story arcs. It’s obvious this is one of his favorite (if not absolute favorite) movies.

I enjoyed this book as a film buff and a Jesus buff. Many of the movies discussed were very obscure and unknown to me. Will I seek them out? Doubtful. I already meditate a lot on the movies I watch and what the filmmakers’ are expressing. My main takeaway from this book was the different forms prayers take. I am now more aware of what I’m expressing to God as I oscillate from Praise to Anger to Reconciliation to Joy and back to Praise. And I’m now more aware of the mediums through which I’m expressing these. Movies aren’t the only things that are prayers. My posture is. My resting face is. My thought life is. My social media presence is. What I put into my body, mind and heart is. This blog post is. The very movie of my life is a prayer. May its viewers see God’s direction in it.

Lord, may I exhale my spirit and inhale yours. So that my next exhalation will be more holy.

“Pray without ceasing.”

1 Thessalonians 5:17

Sleepovers #NotTrending

Sleepovers #NotTrending

by Brock Benson

As I begin this post we are on the eve of another school year. Once again and before we know it Fall will be in the air. Football, chili, and cool mornings are only a blink away. With school on the horizon and new blossoming relationships happening between all of our kiddos, I think for just a moment it’s important to consider some of the different dynamics and challenges this inevitably presents. While I can’t address all the challenges we as parents will experience as our kids go back to school and form new relationships this Fall I think there is one I can specifically address here in this post that we can at least dialogue on and consider. While it hasn’t officially happened in our home yet I can only imagine that having a now first grader, the day is drawing nye when we will be asked “Mommy and Daddy can I spend the night with ______?”

Let me be really clear about some things. First, I don’t write this out of a heart of judgment but out of a place of conviction about where me and my own family are personally. I’m sure there will be some who don’t believe me. But at least I’ve tried to communicate it so maybe some of the negativity can be defused. Secondly I realize there are going be many who read this post who know who I am already but I think it’s only fair I tell you a little bit of my background in case there are some who don’t know who I am.

My wife Cassie and I have lived in Nolensville going on three years now and we have two little boys we love and cherish. Kandler who will be a first grader at Mill Creek and Garner who just turned 1 a few weeks ago who goes to Revive Church’s PDO program two days a week. Kandler has played baseball and since I pastor a local church in the community we’ve gotten to rub shoulders with other families in Nolensville at various times over the last few years. I mention all this to say that I’m a part of this community in a real way. My life is invested here. And I want God’s best for our town like I know so many others do. That is the heart in which I write this post and the lens I hope you’ll read it through.

A few weeks ago during the middle of summer break Kandler was playing with a friend in our neighborhood of Bent Creek and I just happened to be listening in on their conversation. They were talking normal boy talk about their trucks and other toys within the make-believe world they were in at the time. Then for some odd reason the conversation switched randomly and they began the sleep over discussion. Kandler has only ever spent the night with family and cousins and so I was interested to hear how the conversation would go. They talked for a moment about what it would be like. And then they went back to their boyhood world. This seemingly innocent conversation sparked a deeper question for me that I hadn’t really pondered much until they brought it up. Why are sleepovers so rare now days? And more alarmingly why am I personally so uncomfortable with that concept?

Their conversation allowed me to do a quick inventory of my own experience with the topic. Personally growing up there were a few different families that my family and I attended church with and who lived in our neighborhood (who didn’t go to church with us) whom my parents eagerly let me stay the night with once I was of age. (I’m sure it was because I am one of five kids and they wanted any break they could get. lol) By God’s grace I was protected from any horrendous experience or situation during these sleep overs and now looking back I can see how providential that really was.

So then I asked if my experience was so favorable why am I so fearful? Furthermore why has such a shift taken place that sleepovers are now a thing of the past? Obviously the reasons each parent has are varied and complex. Like most decisions we make are. Combine a mixture of our over-protectiveness with fear and I think you have the start of the reason. But let me be fair too. I think there is a great deal of wisdom being exercised by those who choose not to let their kids sleep over at a friend’s house. The world we live in is filled with constant cases of sexual abuse and perversion that leaves innocent children scared for a lifetime. And we as parents can’t bare the thought of letting that happen to our little ones, and rightfully so. A few months ago I noticed some posts on Facebook about this particular question and what questions parents should ask the host parents before their kids sleep over with a friend. Some of the questions were really thought provoking and I really appreciated it being shared. But in my opinion the sleepover choice dilemma reveals an altogether bigger issue we all need to wrestle with.

Why is it that we are so uncomfortable letting our little ones sleep over at their friend’s home?

I think the answer is rather straightforward and simple. We’ve unknowingly drifted into an era of severe isolation. In the world of social media, technology, and culture we believe we are as connected as ever but are we really? Collectively it’s my core belief that deep inside we all realize how isolated we are from one another that’s why the sleep over question is so easy to answer with a resounding NO! Since we have no idea what it means to actually “know” each other anymore the thought of letting our kids sleep in the home of someone we don’t “know” is unthinkable. Sure we will go to the pool together, schedule play dates together, or even occasionally allow our little ones to play in the home of those we really think we know for an afternoon but do anything more than that and the red flag is waved. Overnight is out of bounds because then they are out of our control and eyesight and we can’t let that happen.

I could be wrong but I believe isolation is a really deep struggle of our Nolensville community…and world for that matter. Sure we get together for festivals, concerts, sporting events, and what have you. But really and truly I’m not convinced they aid in us knowing each other better. And it’s not the fault of these festivals or events. The bigger issue is we don’t even know how to get to know each other. While I believe our parents’ generation was a bit more adept in this area than we are, they still had some gaping holes in their ability to connect and build interpersonal relationships that went beyond surface level interaction. And some of those gaping holes have been passed down to our generation and have turned into craters.

No generation does this perfectly. And ours won’t either. There will always be times where we struggle in the darkness of the night to be seen in the light the gospel God’s grace has given. But if we don’t at least struggle together, we in turn will create continued areas of darkness and sin we won’t let anyone see.

Coffee shops, neighborhood pools, community spaces, dog parks and backyards are all great places for good conversations to begin in going deeper with each other. But let me push into this for a moment. Can we really get to know each other intimately if we’re always on neutral turf with each other?

I’ll be the first person to admit that I’m uncomfortable when I’m in someone’s home I don’t know a natural tendency well. But hopefully the more I interact and know them, the greater ties of community that will form and we let our guards down. And our homes will become safe places for each other.

Let me just go a little deeper here for a moment and share a personal point of conviction. I’ve never had my neighbors inside my home. Why? I’ve had no reason to. Translation – I’m so siloed in my own world that I’m only prioritizing relationships I already have instead of trying to nurture new ones. We are never going to drift into seeking community. The enemy is incredibly good at his job and he can make us think we have community when all we have is a profile. It’s the classic bait and switch.

Will the sleep over trend ever return? I don’t know. And I’m not going to think all is lost if it doesn’t. Regardless, the issue itself reveals how crucial it is that our misplaced fear and isolation tendencies have to be challenged if Nolensville is to be what we all are dreaming it can be.